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 ’If someone walked out of Latimer Road tube station for the first time and saw these high rises next to a motorway, then you might think like “fuck”, you know? We moved here after living in Chelsea for a while. My parents lost their money and it seemed quite scary – being a council estate there was so much more stigma associated with it back then, but actually the community in the block is incredible.’

’If someone walked out of Latimer Road tube station for the first time and saw these high rises next to a motorway, then you might think like “fuck”, you know? We moved here after living in Chelsea for a while. My parents lost their money and it seemed quite scary – being a council estate there was so much more stigma associated with it back then, but actually the community in the block is incredible.’

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 ’Some of the kids round here used to be scared of dogs, like. But they played with my dog, Xena there and now they love ‘em.’

’Some of the kids round here used to be scared of dogs, like. But they played with my dog, Xena there and now they love ‘em.’

 Despite having lived in the flats all his life, Jack (18) is indifferent to the future of the building he calls home. ‘I’m not really bothered -  I might need to move out anyway so it doesn’t really affect me too much at the moment. There’s a lot wrong with the flats. It’s an old building. If they knocked it down and built better ones then that might be a better solution.’

Despite having lived in the flats all his life, Jack (18) is indifferent to the future of the building he calls home. ‘I’m not really bothered -  I might need to move out anyway so it doesn’t really affect me too much at the moment. There’s a lot wrong with the flats. It’s an old building. If they knocked it down and built better ones then that might be a better solution.’

 Having lived in the same flat for thirty eight years, Peter has come to be known by almost all of the residents within his community. ’I was eighteen when I moved here; I’ll be dead when I come out. My children were born here, my grandchildren come down here and my dad used to be up the road.’

Having lived in the same flat for thirty eight years, Peter has come to be known by almost all of the residents within his community. ’I was eighteen when I moved here; I’ll be dead when I come out. My children were born here, my grandchildren come down here and my dad used to be up the road.’

 After being told he’d have nine more months to live if he continued drinking, Peter turned to Buddhism to pursue a more fulfilling life. ‘As they say there’s two days of the year you can’t do nothing about: one is yesterday – it’s gone – and the other is tomorrow – it’s not here yet. Just live for today and enjoy life.’

After being told he’d have nine more months to live if he continued drinking, Peter turned to Buddhism to pursue a more fulfilling life. ‘As they say there’s two days of the year you can’t do nothing about: one is yesterday – it’s gone – and the other is tomorrow – it’s not here yet. Just live for today and enjoy life.’

 ’I love learning about their countries as well: so far from here I know Kurdish, I know a lot of Moroccans, a Jordanian, Iranian, Iraqi – I’m going around the world, learning about what they’re like and that. This is like the United Nations here, I swear to god it is.’

’I love learning about their countries as well: so far from here I know Kurdish, I know a lot of Moroccans, a Jordanian, Iranian, Iraqi – I’m going around the world, learning about what they’re like and that. This is like the United Nations here, I swear to god it is.’

 Patricia and her son Ashley have lived on the 20th floor of the flats since 2003. ‘My main issue with it is that I’m in the dark about it – I don’t know what’s going on. If we can stay in the same area and there’s no downsizing then I’d consider it but that’s not realistic - of course it’s not. How are they gonna house – how many of us? 2000 I think? – how are they gonna do that? And they say they don’t want to build tower blocks! That’s a lot less people if it’s not gonna be as high.’

Patricia and her son Ashley have lived on the 20th floor of the flats since 2003. ‘My main issue with it is that I’m in the dark about it – I don’t know what’s going on. If we can stay in the same area and there’s no downsizing then I’d consider it but that’s not realistic - of course it’s not. How are they gonna house – how many of us? 2000 I think? – how are they gonna do that? And they say they don’t want to build tower blocks! That’s a lot less people if it’s not gonna be as high.’

 A vegetable garden which has recently been started by two of the residents of Whitstable House sits in front of the building has brought a number of its residents together. ‘I feel out of place in  any  group of people: among Japanese, among women, among any kind of people, but I started helping out in the garden and have at least gotten to know a few people through that.’

A vegetable garden which has recently been started by two of the residents of Whitstable House sits in front of the building has brought a number of its residents together. ‘I feel out of place in any group of people: among Japanese, among women, among any kind of people, but I started helping out in the garden and have at least gotten to know a few people through that.’

 ’It feels like the government’s obsession with anything that looks vaguely sort of poor… they don’t want big council estates poking up making London look like a working class city anymore - do you know what I mean? It’s a real shame. My dad’s 82 and my mum’s 73 and they both work but they haven’t really got enough money to buy their flat and they haven’t got enough money to buy anywhere else. So what do they do? They’re just going to get uprooted.’

’It feels like the government’s obsession with anything that looks vaguely sort of poor… they don’t want big council estates poking up making London look like a working class city anymore - do you know what I mean? It’s a real shame. My dad’s 82 and my mum’s 73 and they both work but they haven’t really got enough money to buy their flat and they haven’t got enough money to buy anywhere else. So what do they do? They’re just going to get uprooted.’

 An activist from the  Radical Housing Network  distributes fliers throughout the apartments, inviting residents to a meeting to sign petitions to prevent any further regenerative planning. ‘What they do is that they put all their legislation in place and once they’ve done that they come at you like a tsunami and there’s nothing you can do about it – they’ll say “well we consulted you about this two years ago.” They’re very immoral, this council. I live in the next estate over but the point is that once they’re finished here they’re coming for us.’

An activist from the Radical Housing Network distributes fliers throughout the apartments, inviting residents to a meeting to sign petitions to prevent any further regenerative planning. ‘What they do is that they put all their legislation in place and once they’ve done that they come at you like a tsunami and there’s nothing you can do about it – they’ll say “well we consulted you about this two years ago.” They’re very immoral, this council. I live in the next estate over but the point is that once they’re finished here they’re coming for us.’

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 ’I would hopefully be able to stay in this area because I’ve lived here much of my life. I’m just waiting to see what they decide. I don’t really see the point in worrying: I can’t do much about it.’

’I would hopefully be able to stay in this area because I’ve lived here much of my life. I’m just waiting to see what they decide. I don’t really see the point in worrying: I can’t do much about it.’

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 The sense of community experienced by many of the residents in the area is not necessarily shared by all. Patrick, a physicist who has living on the estate since 1991 has generally kept himself to himself. ‘It’s not a very, very integrated community but it’s friendly enough, at least on this floor. Okay, it’s not part of my social life.. I don’t go into their homes very often. Maybe others do.’

The sense of community experienced by many of the residents in the area is not necessarily shared by all. Patrick, a physicist who has living on the estate since 1991 has generally kept himself to himself. ‘It’s not a very, very integrated community but it’s friendly enough, at least on this floor. Okay, it’s not part of my social life.. I don’t go into their homes very often. Maybe others do.’

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 Though they may not want to see the destruction of their homes, there is a general agreement among many of the residents that the buildings are in need of some refurbishment and maintenance. ‘[The lift] is the most hated place in the building. It’s  always  broken –  always!’

Though they may not want to see the destruction of their homes, there is a general agreement among many of the residents that the buildings are in need of some refurbishment and maintenance. ‘[The lift] is the most hated place in the building. It’s always broken – always!’